Strong Dollar has good and bad impact on economy

Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen, left, answers a question from International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde on Wednesday. European stocks fell earlier Thursday on the back of comments made by Ms. Yellen. PHOTO: ASSOCIATED PRESS

Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen, left, answers a question from International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde on Wednesday. European stocks fell earlier Thursday on the back of comments made by Ms. Yellen. PHOTO: ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tomorrow, the Zarb School of Business at Hofstra University will host their third annual export seminar series “Going $trong: the US Dollar and the Global Marketplace.” A panel will examine current currency trends, outlooks and the effects of currency fluctuations on US businesses operating in the global marketplace. Dr Anoop Rai, a professor of finance at Hofstra, will be speaking at the conference. Dr Rai explains how the strength of the dollar is good and bad for the domestic economy.

Check it out!

[audio https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/191633883/HMWC%20Interviews/Dr%20Anoop%20Rai%2C%20Strong%20Dollar%20Conference%2C%205.7.15.mp3]
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Money and Midterms: a tale of purse-strings and politics

Young voters, non-white voters and unmarried women are typically underrepresented in midterm elections. Photo by REUTERS/Matt Sullivan

Young voters, non-white voters and unmarried women are typically underrepresented in midterm elections. Photo by REUTERS/Matt Sullivan

In the aftermath of any big election, like last week’s Midterms, people tend to ponder the impact that money has on results. Does whoever spend the most win? How much money do you need to win? Is this bad for the future of politics? Viveca Novak, editorial and communications director at the Center for Responsive Politics, answers all of those questions in this interview from last week’s Hofstra’s Morning Wake Up Call.