DA Rice: Israel our ‘most critical ally’

Nassau County DA and Democratic Congressional candidate Kathleen Rice visits the Western Wall in Israel with her brother Paul. Image Courtesy of Kathleen Rice.

Nassau County DA and Democratic Congressional candidate Kathleen Rice visits the Western Wall in Israel with her brother Paul. Image Courtesy of Kathleen Rice via Twitter.

Nassau County District Attorney and Democratic Congressional candidate Kathleen Rice returned from a three-day trip to Israel last week where she met with leading economic and national security experts, local business owners, and community leaders and families with strong ties to Nassau County’s Jewish community.

“I think Israel is our most critical ally,” said Rice in an interview with Hofstra’s Morning Wake Up Call. “It’s important for us as Americans to support them.”

Here’s her full interview with HMWC’s Brianna Borresen and Neil A. Carousso.

Boehner lawsuit a sincere complaint in contentious Congress, though impeachment unlikely

House Minority Leader John Boehner of (R-OH) walks past US President Barack Obama (L) to introduce Obama prior to him speaking at the Republican GOP House Issues Conference in Baltimore, Maryland, January 29, 2010. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 96007823

House Minority Leader John Boehner of (R-OH) walks past US President Barack Obama (L) to introduce Obama prior to him speaking at the Republican GOP House Issues Conference in Baltimore, Maryland, January 29, 2010.  Photo credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

House Speaker John Boehner’s lawsuit against President Barack Obama has passed the House Rules Committee. Next stop, floor vote?

With Congress’ August recess right around the corner, many are wondering what will happen next.

Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin has already called for impeachment, but she shouldn’t hold her breath according to Meenekshi Bose, professor of political science and Director of Hofstra University’s Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency.

Bose breaks down the possible abuses of presidential power in this segment from this mornings edition of Hofstra’s Morning Wake Up Call.

 

Feminist author: Hobby Lobby ruling sets dangerous precedent

Cristina Page, author of How the Pro-choice Movement Saved America. Courtesy of @CristinaPage twitter.

Cristina Page, author of How the Pro-choice Movement Saved America. Courtesy of @CristinaPage twitter.

On June 30, the Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision taht the government cannot require certain employers to provide insurance coverage for birth control if they conflict with the employer’s religious beliefs.

The decision has sparked a national debate over women’s rights, contraception and health care, not to mention religion.

Cristina Page, a consultant for the Institute of Reproductive Health Access and the author of How the Pro-choice Movement Saved America, tells Hofstra’s Morning Wake Up Call about the dangerous precedent set by the ruling.

ACLU insight into the Central American immigrant wave

July 11, 2014: People are rafted to the Mexican shore, across the Suchiate river that separates Tecun Uman, Guatemala and Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on a makeshift raft made from inner tubes of trucks attached to wooden boards. Scores of Central Americans pay a modest fee crossing the river on these improvised rafts. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

July 11, 2014: People are rafted to the Mexican shore, across the Suchiate river that separates Tecun Uman, Guatemala and Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on a makeshift raft made from inner tubes of trucks attached to wooden boards. Scores of Central Americans pay a modest fee crossing the river on these improvised rafts. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

At last count, over 57,000 Central American children have come to the United States since the start of the year, according to USA Today. That number is expected to grow to over 90,000 by the time the year is out.

With Border Patrol overwhelmed with processing the unaccompanied minors, President Barack Obama has asked Congress for nearly $4 billion to respond to the situation.

The question on many people’s minds are why are these children here, and what can be done about this ‘humanitarian crisis’ as the president calls it.

Layla Razavi, regional advocacy and policy counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union, weighed in on Hofstra’s Morning Wake Up Call.

 

Study: 1 in 10 working age deaths related to alcohol

Alcohol accounts for one in 10 working-age deaths nationwide, mostly men, and cuts lives short by as many as three decades, federal health officials reported. (Credit: Steven Sunshine)

Alcohol accounts for one in 10 working-age deaths nationwide, mostly men, and cuts lives short by as many as three decades, federal health officials reported. (Credit: Steven Sunshine)

A new study by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control finds that alcohol accounts for one in 10 working age deaths nationwide.

Binge-drinking, partying, frequent cocktails and drinking alone all have played into the complicated mosaic that defines Americans’ relationship with alcohol.

Dr Robert Brewer, co-author of the study and head of the alcohol program for the National Centers for Disease Control, came on Hofstra’s Morning Wake Up Call to discuss the study’s findings and elaborate on it’s dangerous implications.

30 percent of the world is now fat, no country fit to fight battle of the bulge

fat

Almost a third of the world is now fat, and no country has been able to curb obesity rates in the last three decades, according to a new global analysis.

Hofstra University professor of nutrition Paola Puig sheds a light on how 2 billion people worldwide are losing the battle of the bulge.

Hofstra set to make SAT/ACT optional starting in 2015

Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY. Image courtesy of Hofstra University.

Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY. Image courtesy of Hofstra University.

Hofstra University is joining the growing ranks of campuses across the country that are making the SAT and ACT optional, rather than requiring students to submit scores from those admissions tests when they apply.

The school’s admissions officials will continue to focus on students’ high school academic records, as they have in the past.

The university came to this decision after several years of discussions among admissions officers, faculty and other campus officials.

Bob Schaeffer, Public Education Director at FairTest: National Center for Fair and Open Testing, was a part of these talks. He called in to Hofstra’s Morning Wake Up Call to analyze what this decision means for future Hofstra students.